Investment Management

Posted on Friday, November 17 2017 at 8:38 am by

SEC Announces Enforcement Results, Sets New Priorities

By Paul Foley, John I. Sanders, and Lauren Henderson

On November 15, 2017, the SEC announced the results of its enforcement actions for fiscal year 2017 and stated its enforcement priorities for fiscal year 2018.

During fiscal year 2017, the SEC brought 754 enforcement actions, returned $1.07 billion to harmed investors, and obtained judgments and orders totaling $3.789 billion in disgorgement and penalties.[i] Of the 754 enforcement actions, 446 were standalone cases.[ii] Investment advisory issues, securities offerings, and issuer reporting each accounted for 20% of the standalone cases, roughly in line with fiscal year 2016 results.[iii]

In the current fiscal year, the following five core principles will guide the SEC’s enforcement actions:[iv]

  • Focus on Main Street (i.e., unsophisticated) investors
  • Focus on individual accountability (as opposed to organizational accountability)
  • Keep pace with technological change
  • Impose sanctions that most effectively further enforcement goals
  • Assess the allocation of resources

Both the enforcement results for the recently completed fiscal year and the stated priorities for the current fiscal year reflect Chairman Clayton’s oft-articulated dedication to the SEC’s mandates: protect investors, maintain fair and efficient markets, facilitate capital formation.

If you have any questions about the SEC enforcement actions or enforcement priorities, please feel free to contact us directly.

Paul Foley is a partner with Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton’s Winston-Salem and New York offices. John I. Sanders and Lauren Henderson are associates based in the firm’s Winston-Salem office.

[i] SEC, SEC Enforcement Division Issues Report on Priorities and FY 2017 Results (Nov. 15, 2017), available at https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2017-210.

[ii] Id.

[iii] Id.

[iv] Id.

Posted on Thursday, August 31 2017 at 5:45 pm by

DOL’s Proposed Rule Would Extend the Transition Period for Certain Fiduciary Rule Exemptions to July 2019

 By Paul Foley and John I. Sanders

Today, the text of a Department of Labor (the “DOL”) Proposed Rule we have been anticipating for several weeks was made available to the public.[i] The Proposed Rule would “extend the special transition period” for certain components of the Best Interest Contract Exemption (the “BIC Exemption”) and certain other exemptions to the Fiduciary Rule.[ii] Perhaps the most important aspect of the Proposed Rule is that it would maintain the current version of the BIC Exemption, which requires fiduciaries relying on it to merely “give prudent advice that is in retirement investors’ best interest, charge no more than reasonable compensation, and avoid misleading statements.”[iii] In making the proposal, the DOL stated that its purpose was to give the DOL “time to consider possible changes and alternatives” to the exemptions.[iv] If finalized, the Proposed Rule would extend the transition period of the effected exemptions to July 1, 2019.[v]

Please contact us if you have any questions about this article or the DOL Fiduciary Rule generally.

Paul Foley is a partner with Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton’s Winston-Salem and New York offices.  John I. Sanders is an associate based in the firm’s Winston-Salem office.

[i] DOL, Notice of proposed amendments to PTE 2016-01, PTE 2016-02, and PTE 84-24, 82 Fed. Reg. 41365, available at https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/08/31/2017-18520/extension-of-transition-period-and-delay-of-applicability-dates-best-interest-contract-exemption-pte.

[ii] Id.

[iii] Id. at 41367.

[iv] Id. at 41365.

[v] Id.

Posted on Tuesday, August 22 2017 at 2:05 pm by

Adviser Settles with SEC over Insider Trading Controls for Political Intelligence Firms

By Paul Foley and John I. Sanders

Yesterday, the SEC announced a settlement under which Deerfield Management Company L.P. (“Deerfield”), a hedge fund adviser, agreed to pay more than $4.6 million.[i]  The SEC charged Deerfield with failing to “establish, maintain and enforce policies and procedures reasonably designed to prevent the illegal use of inside information”[ii] as required by Section 204A of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the “Advisers Act”).[iii]

The SEC cited Deerfield for failing to tailor its policies and procedures “to address the specific risks presented by its business.”[iv]  In particular, Deerfield’s reliance on third-party political intelligence firms to provide insight into upcoming legislative and regulatory action created the risk that Deerfield would receive and illegally trade on inside information (e.g., a regulator’s unannounced decision to finalize a rule that would materially affect certain industries and publicly traded companies).[v]

The SEC’s settlement with Deerfield serves as a warning for advisers utilizing investment strategies dependent on obtaining or correctly predicting non-public information (e.g., unannounced mergers and acquisitions or the governmental approval of a pharmaceutical product), particularly those advisers partnering with third party consultants and analysts.  Such advisers should consider whether their current policies and procedures address the specific risks likely to arise under such strategies and partnerships.

Please contact us if you have any questions about the SEC’s recent settlement with Deerfield or an adviser’s obligations under the Advisers Act generally.

Paul Foley is a partner with Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton’s Winston-Salem and New York offices.  John I. Sanders is an associate based in the firm’s Winston-Salem office.

[i] SEC, Hedge Fund Adviser Charged for Inadequate Controls to Prevent Insider Trading (Aug. 21, 2017), available at https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2017-146 (hereinafter SEC Release).

[ii] Id.

[iii] 15 USC 80b-4a (2017).

[iv] SEC Release, supra note 1.

[v] Id.