Investment Management

Archive for September 2012

Posted on Tuesday, September 18 2012 at 11:30 pm by

SEC Issues Proposed Rules Regarding Elimination of General Solicitation Ban

The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) has issued proposed rules that would permit certain forms of “general solicitation” in private offerings made in reliance on Rule 506 of Regulation D or Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”).  

Rule 506 Offerings

Rule 506 of Regulation D provides a non-exclusive safe harbor that permits the sale of securities in private placements to certain persons, including purchasers who the issuer reasonably believes are accredited investors and up to 35 other purchasers subject to certain conditions.  In addition, offerings made pursuant to Rule 506 are not subject to any state securities registration requirements.  Currently, Rule 506 prohibits any form of general solicitation or general advertising in connection with a sale of securities under Rule 506.

The JOBS Act directed the SEC to amend Rule 506 by July 4, 2012, to permit general solicitation or general advertising in Rule 506 offerings, provided the only purchasers of the securities are accredited investors.

The proposed rules would permit general advertisements in connection with Rule 506 offerings if the issuer takes “reasonable steps to verify that the purchasers of the securities are accredited investors” and “all purchasers of securities must be accredited investors, either because they come within one of the enumerated categories of persons that qualify as accredited investors or the issuer reasonably believes that they do, at the time of the sale of the securities”.  However, issuers that do not engage in a general solicitation may to continue to adhere to Rule 506 as it currently exists and sell to up to 35 non-accredited investors if general solicitation is not employed.

While the proposed rules require issuers to take “reasonable steps” to verify that purchasers of the securities are accredited investors, they do not specify the methods necessary to satisfy this requirement.  The SEC specifically avoided providing specifics in order to provide sufficient flexibility to accommodate different types of transactions and changes in market practices and to avoid the market giving unnecessary weight to any factors the SEC may have otherwise provided.  It should be recognized, however, that this approach by the SEC is likely to create uncertainty among issuers as to what steps will be sufficient to comply with the proposed rules.  

The proposed rules instead provide that whether the steps taken are “reasonable” would be an objective determination, based on the particular facts and circumstances of each transaction.  The proposed rules do, however, provide that an issuer should consider the following factors when evaluating the reasonableness of the steps taken to verify that a purchaser is an accredited investor:

  • the nature of the purchaser and the type of accredited investor that the purchaser claims to be;
  • the amount and type of information that the issuer has about the purchaser; and
  • the nature of the offering, such as the manner in which the purchaser was solicited to participate in the offering, and the terms of the offering, such as a minimum investment amount.

With regard to the last factor, the proposed rules indicate that an issuer that solicits new investors through a website accessible to the general public or through a widely disseminated email or social media solicitation would likely be obligated to take greater measures to verify accredited investor status than an issuer that solicits new investors from a database of pre-screened accredited investors created and maintained by a reasonably reliable third party, such as a registered broker-dealer.  In the case of website offerings, the SEC does not believe that an issuer would have taken reasonable steps to verify accredited investor status if it required only that a person check a box in a questionnaire or sign a form, absent other information about the purchaser indicating accredited investor status.  In the case of a widely disseminated email or social media solicitation, the SEC believes that an issuer would be entitled to rely on a third party that has verified a person’s status as an accredited investor, provided that the issuer has a reasonable basis to rely on such third-party verification.  Additionally, the SEC also believes that a purchaser’s ability to meet a high minimum investment amount could be relevant to whether an issuer’s verification steps would be reasonable.  For example, the ability of a purchaser to satisfy a minimum investment amount requirement that is sufficiently high such that only accredited investors could reasonably be expected to meet it, with a direct cash investment that is not financed by the issuer or by any other third party, could be taken into consideration in verifying accredited investor status.

Regardless of the particular steps taken, issuers will need to retain adequate records that document the steps taken to verify that a purchaser was an accredited investor.  Any issuer claiming an exemption from the registration requirements of Section 5 has the burden of showing that it is entitled to that exemption.  However, if a person who does not meet the criteria for any category of accredited investor purchases securities in a Rule 506(c) offering, we believe that the issuer would not lose the ability to rely on the proposed Rule 506(c) exemption for that offering, so long as the issuer took reasonable steps to verify that the purchaser was an accredited investor and had a reasonable belief that such purchaser was an accredited investor.

Effect on Sections 3(c)(1) and 3(c)(7) under the Investment Company Act

Privately offered funds, such as hedge funds, venture capital funds and private equity funds, typically rely on Section 4(a)(2) and the Rule 506 safe harbor to offer and sell their interests without registration under the Securities Act.  In addition, privately offered funds generally rely on exclusions from the definition of “investment company” under Section 3(c)(1) and Section 3(c)(7) the Investment Company Act, which enables them to be excluded from the regulatory provisions of that Act.  Privately offered funds are precluded, however, from relying on either of these two exclusions if they make a public offering of their securities.  The proposed rules provide that SEC believes the effect of the proposed rules is to permit privately offered funds to make a general solicitation without losing either of the exclusions under the Investment Company Act.

Amendment to Rule 144A

Rule 144A provides a non-exclusive safe harbor exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act for resales of certain “restricted securities” to qualified institutional buyers (“QIBs”).  In order for a transaction to come within existing Rule 144A, a seller must have a reasonable basis for believing that the offeree or purchaser is a QIB and must take reasonable steps to ensure that the purchaser is aware that the seller may rely on Rule 144A.  The proposed rules revise Rule 144A to provide that securities sold pursuant to Rule 144A may be offered to persons other than QIBs, including by means of general solicitation, provided that securities are sold only to persons that the seller and any person acting on behalf of the seller reasonably believe is a QIB.  Under the proposed rules, resales of securities pursuant to Rule 144A could be conducted using general solicitation, so long as the purchasers are limited to QIBs.

If you have any questions regarding the matters addressed above, please contact us.